Prayers for Religions Traditions

Jewish High Holy Days (Rosh Hashanah-Yom Kippur)

Notice: We (name of your congregation) extend our prayers and regards to our Jewish neighbors (name of neighboring synagogue) on the occasion of their most sacred time of the year, the High Holy Days, which begin with Rosh Hashanah (sundown Sept. 24-26) the Jewish New Year, and climax with Yom Kippur or Day of Atonement (Oct. 4), a time of fasting and repentance. Jews will pray and celebrate the gift of the new year on Rosh Hashanah and fast and pray for repentance on Yom Kippur.  The words “Shana tova”  or “Happy New Year” are an appropriate greeting for these holy days for Jews.

Prayer: God of all people, we honor our neighbors who follow the religious tradition of Judaism and we ask your blessing on our Jewish neighbors and Jews around the world as they observe their High Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. May the gifts of their tradition be a blessing to them and they to all people as we all seek to find peace, justice and sustainability in our challenged world. Amen.


Muslim Eid al Adha (conclusion of Hajj)

Notice: We (name of your congregation) extend our prayers and regards to our Muslim neighbors (name of neighboring mosque) on the occasion of their observance of Eid al Adha (approximately Oct.4), the Islamic festival of sacrifice and the day after the annual Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca concludes. It involves recalling the story of Abraham’s willingness to sacrifice his son in obedience to God (Allah). The words “Eid Mubarak,” or “blessed Eid” are an appropriate greeting.

Prayer: God of all people, we honor our neighbors who follow the religious tradition of Islam and we ask your blessing on our Muslim neighbors and Muslims around the world as they observe their holy day of Eid al Adha. May the gifts of their tradition be a blessing to them and they to all people as we all seek to find peace, justice and sustainability in our challenged world.


Muslim Eid al Fitr (conclusion of Ramadan)

Notice: We (name of your congregation) extend our prayers and regards to our Muslim neighbors (name of neighboring mosque) on the occasion of their observance of Eid al Fitr, the Islamic festival of  concluding the month of fasting called Ramadan. The words “Eid Mubarak,” or “blessed Eid” are an appropriate greeting.

Prayer: God of all people, we honor our neighbors who follow the religious tradition of Islam and we ask your blessing on our Muslim neighbors and Muslims around the world as they observe their holy day of Eid al Fitr and conclude their Ramadan month of fasting. May the gifts of their tradition be a blessing to them and they to all people as we all seek to find peace, justice and sustainability in our challenged world.